Good luck!

Good luck, guys!

I’ll be in tomorrow before the exam, loitering somewhere in the English corridor with the baby. Come by and see me.

You’ll be fine. You’re all totally capable, and you’re going to do yourselves proud, I know it.

Get a good night’s sleep.

Advertisements

Prose Literary Study Feedback

Hello dears,

Some feedback on your lit. study responses from last week:

  • Ensure you are specific in your introductions – it’s not enough to say that a variety of techniques are used, give us examples.
  • There’s a lack of quotes in some of the responses – you should know these texts inside out by now, and should aim to quote extensively in your essays.
  • Consider how the writers’ depiction of their characters, etc. impacts us as a reader, particularly in our feelings towards them, and our relationship with the narrator. For example, Jane’s depiction of the isolation she faces at Gateshead immediately create sympathy for her – does that also, perhaps, encourage us to find her a more reliable narrator than a less sympathetic character?
  • Still need to be more comparative in your analysis of both texts – explore fully the similarities and differences in your response to the question.
  • Technical accuracy, folks – this is most decidedly not optional. Miss a line between paragraphs; actually take new paragraphs; check your punctuation, especially after a quote – unless it’s embedded in a sentence, you need a capital letter after it; PHRASING – please, please, please read over what you’ve written. There’s a few examples of nonsensical ramblings here.
  • Conclusions are important – reiterate your evaluative stance and overall argument, and summarise the points you’ve made. LEAVE TIME TO DO THIS.
  • Some of you need to watch your handwriting (you know who you are). I realise I’m old, so therefore have rubbish eyesight, but if they can’t read it, they can’t mark it.

REVISE. Any questions, let me know. For my own amusement, I’ve also included a photo of Sophia, who is concerned about the depth of your analysis:

IMG_0887

 

Literary Study questions – Prose

Hi folks,

Have plans completed for the following questions for Thursday 26th April – you’ll write one of them under FULL EXAM CONDITIONS then.

  • Compare and contrast the treatment of love in any two novels.
  • Discuss the ways in which themes of isolation and/or estrangement are explored in two novels or three short stories.
  • “It is the alienation of the individual which pervades …fiction.” Discuss with reference to any two novels.
  • Compare and contrast the treatment of the “darkness of marriage” in any two novels.

The three stage structure we discussed is below:

Comparing Texts for Literary Study and Dissertation

Jane Eyre/Rebecca Lit Study Presentations

I was impressed by these, guys. Use them to aid your revision for Monday.

External Retraints – Erin

Discuss the thematic significance of social status in – Kyle

The role and function of the principle female Ben

social issues catherine

Love in jane eyre and rebecca

IMG_0239IMG_0240IMG_0241IMG_0242IMG_0243IMG_0233IMG_0234IMG_0235IMG_0236IMG_0237

IMG_0238

Prelim Revision Task

You will be assigned ONE of the below questions and plan a response today. You will use that plan to present a response to the class on Wednesday 10th January.

1.“The novel can deal unflinchingly with the social issues of the day.” Discuss with reference to any two novels. Catherine

2.Discuss the extent to which the principal characters in two novels are limited by the external constraints placed upon them. Erin

3.Discuss the ways in which themes of isolation and/or estrangement are explored in two novels. Kael

4.Compare and contrast the role and function of the principal female characters in two novels. Ben

5.Discuss some of the principal means by which tension is created and sustained in any two novels.  Kirsty

6.Compare and contrast the treatment of love in any two novels. Anna

7.Discuss the thematic significance of social status in any two novels. Kyle

8.Discuss the effectiveness of the exploration of identity in any two novels. Eliza